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Quality cool climate wine from the Orange wine growing region in New South Wales, Australia

Cellar Door

We (that is, Rhonda and Stephen Doyle) planted the pioneering wine grape vineyard in the Spring of 1983. These Merlot Noir vines thrived in the warm, free-draining gravels of Bloodwood. The first vintage, yielding 650 litres of exciting varietal essence, duly followed in April 1986. Over the last three decades, we have cared for and nurtured those original vines on our Griffin Road property. Today, in their maturity, they offer the best potential for the production of the highest quality, cool climate fruit which is the enduring foundation of all our Bloodwood wine styles.

2015 Riesling (12 bottle case)

bloodwood riesling 2014.jpg
bloodwood riesling 2014.jpg

2015 Riesling (12 bottle case)

348.00

"Light green gold in colour with a restrained bouquet of kaffir lime and floral notes, this bright Bloodwood Riesling has a satisfyingly long textured palate for its weight, showing the cool citrus and sinewy minerality so typical of this vineyard. Prudent cellaring will allow the subtle nuances of this fine wine to shine."

11.5% Al/Vol

 

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Vineyard

The grapes for the 2013 Riesling are sourced from all but eight lower rows of the entire Riesling vineyard. The vineyard faces due north on an 18 degree slope with the rows approximately South East North West in orientation on a Scott-Henry trellis system. The trellis is opened towards the top of the slope in a southerly direction allowing important mid and late season sunlight to linger on the hanging fruit. The laminated siltstones and shales of the slope allow for very reliable drainage and a warmer start to the growing season. This is a vitally important quality vineyard at Bloodwood producing high quality fruit seemingly regardless of vintage conditions.

Vintage Conditions

The Weather At Bloodwood is always the same; It's Different!

I suppose the best way to characterise vintage 2014 is that a brown disaster turned into a green disaster. You had to turn from a second row forward with your head a bit too far up one too many scrums into a ballerina capable of doing a pirouette off the end of an adage while anticipating a grand allegro to survive, Basically we had to cope with hotter and drier than usual conditions until around the middle of February followed by persistent rains over the ripening months. Briefly the recorded facts are as follows:

 

Winter/spring rainfall: Winter rainfall (Jun Jul Aug) was marginally down on the long term medium however Spring (Sept Oct Nov) was 32% below the long term medium.  We began irrigating here at Bloodwood on 29/10/2014 when early January is typical for us.
Weather up to and including harvest. Hot and bothered would be the shorthand here. Actually 0.4C warmer than 2013 up to harvest and 0.2C warmer than 2013 from first fruit harvested to the end of vintage in mid-April. We were managing for the creeping brown disaster of the growing season when it completely flipped from around mid-Febuary. Comparative rainfall from 15th Feb to 31st March 2013/2014 was 139.2mm verses 225mm this year.  In summary, a potential brown disaster changed overnight to a potential green disaster so vintage success this year depended on how ripe your fruit was before the break and how light on your feet you were as a viticulturist and wine maker as the rains began to test your skills.   A complicating factor was that crop loads  (as a consequence of the dry and sunny bud initiation period of January 2013) were generally higher than vintage 2013 so pressure from Botrytis Cinera was high in late ripening varieties. In vintage 2014,  13%al/vol is the new 14% al/vol and this is no bad thing.  

As far as the Riesling is concerned, it was advanced enough to be unaffected by the late rains and it came into the winery in good shape after having to hang a while on the vine. 

Winemaking

The moderate crop nature gave us in 2014 was picked in good condition on the morning of 3rd March and whole bunch pressed into a refrigerated fermentation tank for rough settling overnight. No sulfur was added in the vineyard although 15 ppm was added to the pressed juice in tank. After settling and careful racking, the partially clarified juice was warmed to 18C whilst fermentation commenced. Cooling to maintain 14 to 19C continued throughout a 28 day ferment at which point the finishing wine was allowed to warm to 20 C through to dryness. Forty ppm SO2 was added as the new wine was racked off gross lees and transferred to a temperature controlled storage tank to spend five months on fine lees. Protein and cold stability tests were followed by sterile filtration and bottling in September 2014. We think the 2014 is a worthy successor to our very successful 2013 which places it amongst the best Rieslings we've seen from Bloodwood.

Wine Analysis

pH 3.08
Acidity 7.85 g/l
Al/Vol 11.5 %

Tasting Notes

"Light green gold in colour with a restrained bouquet of kaffir lime and floral notes, this bright Bloodwood Riesling has a satisfyingly long textured palate for its weight, showing the cool citrus and sinewy minerality so typical of this vineyard. Prudent cellaring will allow the subtle nuances of this fine wine to shine."

11.5% Al/Vol

 

Tight control. Excellent fruit intensity. Slatey, minerally finish....This Riesling flies an impressive flag both on the palate and through the extended finish.

11.5% Al/Vol Rating 95 Drink 2028.
— Mr Halliday’s review of 2014 Riesling
Pale straw; mineral laden on the bouquet, with prominent lemon juice and fennel aromas; the palate is taut and racy, firm, unevolved and the firm acidity is certainly at the higher end of the spectrum; time will be essential to maximise drinking pleasure.

11.5% alc. Rating 92 Drink 2021
— Mr Halliday’s review of 2011 Riesling
2010 Bloodwood Riesling
Stephen Doyle and his wife Rhonda are two of the pioneers of Orange District wine. They have been making wines in their own particular way since their first vintage in 1986. Bloodwood has developed a reputation for its satirical labels and individual styles, but especially for the quality of its Riesling. In 2009, Stephen made a particularly good example. The wine displayed vibrant limey notes and mineral characters on the palate, finishing with dry, crisp acidity. However, the 2010 (made from the vines planted in 1984) is a cracker, and is especially recommended for lovers of the dry, minerally style. I visited the winery a month or so ago to sample the wine which will be released just before Christmas: “Intense floral aromas with hints of honeysuckle. Very refined, delicate palate with a fine minerally texture, great length and vibrant limey acidity. Outstanding 12.8% Screwcap
— Winewise Review by Len Sorbello
Fragrant spice, wild flower and apple aromas lead into an intense and lime-juicy palate, with immaculate balance and length. Screwcap.
12.5% alc. Rating 96 Drink 2020
— Mr Halliday’s review of 2008 Riesling
A gloriously fragrant bouquet with a surge of lime/lemon blossom, then an emphatic palate full of lime and a hint of herb; finishes well. Screwcap.
12.5% alc. Rating 94 Drink 2018
— Mr Halliday’s review of 2009 Riesling
Rhonda and Steven Doyle were two of the pioneers of the Orange region when they began to plant their 8.4-ha vineyard in 1983. At an altitude of around 850 m, there was never any question about the suitability of the climate for riesling. This wine is pale green-straw in colour, with a lovely floral blossom bouquet. The tightly focused palate has lime/citrus fruit wrapped around a strong mineral backbone - to use a mixed metaphor, a lady-in-waiting for the next few years.

Rating: 93
— Mr Halliday’s review of 2010 Riesling